Abandoned, Haunted

Snooping in Storybook Castle

The entrance to the castle.

The entrance to Storybook Castle.

A deserted castle in the woods always has a few stories to tell. Maybe you’ve heard of the heart-shaped pools at Storybook that fill with blood on a full moon, or the Rapunzel-inspired succubus who hangs her hair to tempt gullible fishermen to their doom in the highest tower. Locals will tell you about the mad widow kept locked in a room with no doorknobs, who escaped on occasion to ride through town on horseback tossing gifts to children. (Supposedly, you can still find scratch marks where she clawed her way out.)

Most of these stories don’t hold water, of course, but the truth is nearly as strange.  For starters, no one has ever lived in the castle.

The facts are few but generally accepted.  Construction began in 1907 by a prominent New Yorker and heir to the builder of a famous canal. He transformed a nondescript wooden lodge that already stood on the property into a fanciful fairy tale castle modeled after a Scottish design, cutting corners with local river rocks on the facade but indulging in fine imported marble for the interior.  Some say the castle was built out of love for his ailing wife, who suffered from mental illness. Unfortunately, the owner died in 1921 just before the structure was completed. Instead of moving into the romantic hideaway, his grieving widow was checked into a sanatorium shortly thereafter.  The couple’s daughter and sole heir ran off to Europe with a new husband, leaving a caretaker to look after the unfinished castle.

The courtyard out back is partially maintained, the lawn had been mowed in the past month.

The courtyard out back is periodically maintained, the lawn appeared to have been mowed recently.

In 1949, the property was purchased by the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of the Masonic Order, an African American group based in Manhattan.  The original plan was to convert the castle to a masonic home for the elderly, but it was instead used for many years as a hunting and fishing resort. Later, the property became a summer camp for inner-city youth. As far as I can tell, the expansive grounds still serve this function today, though the castle itself has reportedly only been used to creep out campers over the years.  There may be no more fertile ground for legends than a summer camp set in the vicinity of a derelict castle.  Tales of glowing green eyes, apparitions in white, moving portraits, and self-slamming doors abound.

In 2005, the Prince Hall Masons and the Open Space Initiative announced an agreement to protect the castle and surrounding land, limiting future development and prohibiting residential subdivision.  Unfortunately, nearly 10 years later, the castle is left completely vulnerable to vandals and exposed to the elements. Though the interior is remarkably well-preserved, several rooms are tagged up with uninspired graffiti.  For this reason, I’ve chosen not to reveal the true name or location of the castle, be advised that the building is located on private property.

Click through the gallery to see the interior:




15 thoughts on “Snooping in Storybook Castle

  1. Absolutely beautiful! You are fortunate to have been allowed in. You have a great job!


    Posted by Daniela | 9-8-14., 1:30 pm
  2. That was wonderful…and sad as well. It looks like it could be beautiful and in use again…if only……


    Posted by Raechelle | 9-8-14., 6:14 pm
  3. Another fascinating piece, Will, thanks so much….and thanks for keeping the location a secret.


    Posted by Frank | 9-8-14., 7:49 pm
  4. Absolutely stunning photos. Takes a person to another time. As always, thank you for sharing. Beautiful photos and words.


    Posted by Tanya w | 9-10-14., 3:36 am
  5. Is that an intact coal-fired range? Because that looks like an intact coal-fired range. Why hasn’t anybody jumped on this property like a puppy on a cupcake?! It’s AWESOME.


    Posted by Jenny Islander | 9-14-14., 1:06 am
  6. Looks more magical, than haunted. How lovely if someone could buy it and love it like it deserves…it’s beautiful!


    Posted by Shelley Ellis | 9-18-14., 12:01 pm
  7. Beaverkill!!! And I forget the name of that specific area with the Scottish name. Love the bridge leading to this area between Roscoe and Beaverkill


    Posted by Brocha | 9-24-14., 2:56 am
  8. Very Beautiful indeed! But it’s not hard to find out where the castle is and it’s true name.😉


    Posted by anthony | 10-3-14., 9:48 am
  9. Where would I be able to find this? I happen to be an AP Art student looking for more places to take photos for my concentration this year and your website has been an amazing resource! Wonderful articles and photos by the way!


    Posted by Sam | 12-18-14., 5:08 pm
  10. Its my understanding that it’s been purchased again or is being managed differently and it now has a grounds keeper/patrol person. I have friends who live nearby and would visit as kids.


    Posted by Court | 6-19-15., 10:38 pm
  11. I am absolutely in love!!! I can’t imagine what it would be like walking through this place. Just Stunning!


    Posted by Sheri Truitt | 10-10-15., 11:13 am
  12. is it for sale? Id love to buy it .


    Posted by kitten | 5-25-16., 5:15 pm


  1. Pingback: Untapped Staff Picks: Rizzoli’s to Reopen in NoMad, Picasso Tapestry from Four Seasons Moves « Untapped Cities - 9-8-14.

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