//
abandoned places

Wildlife Sanctuary

This tag is associated with 2 posts

Getting Lost on North Brother Island

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_06

A tuberculosis pavilion crowns the treetops of North Brother Island like an Aztec ruin.

Most New Yorkers have never heard of North Brother Island, but they should take comfort in the fact that new trees are growing and manmade things are going by the wayside just a stone’s throw from Rikers and a few miles from LaGuardia Airport. New York City’s abandoned island proves that as much as we think we have a handle on things, nature is never far behind. Just give it time.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_23

Many of the older structures are splitting at the seams, but there’s little hope or interest in preserving them.

In the case of North Brother Island, it took fifty years to transform a sparsely planted hospital campus to a bona fide wildlife sanctuary surging with fresh green life. Established as a city hospital for quarantinable diseases in 1885, it became a disreputable rehab center for adolescent drug addicts prior to its abandonment in the 1960s. To add to the intrigue, the island was the site of a catastrophic shipwreck and the residence of the notorious Typhoid Mary. (For a detailed history of Riverside Hospital, see Ian Ference’s thorough account over at the Kingston Lounge.) Today, opportunistic ivy floods the old lawns and races up the corners of the dormitories. Elsewhere, invasive kudzu—a Japanese import—holds at least an acre of land in its leafy grip. Few animals roam this untrodden landscape, with the exception of a handful of raccoons that took a dip in the East River and discovered the greenest place around.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_22

An airplane takes off from nearby LaGuardia airport with a gantry crane in view.

Even though it’s one of the least inhabited places in New York City, you can still find pathways on North Brother Island.  Parks employees and occasional visitors leave a network of rabbit trails on the forest floor, but they taper off on the south side, where a few ruins beckon you further into the weeds. I trudged through the brush for over an hour only to end up right back where I started, and it wouldn’t be the last time I was forced to admit defeat to the thorny wilds of Riverside Hospital. The island plays tricks on you, but it’s liberating to lose your way.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_12

Surrealism made doubly surreal in a patient mural.

In order to protect the habitat and visitors from harm, North Brother Island is permanently closed to the public, and strictly off-limits during nesting season. Frequently patrolled due to its vicinity to Rikers, it’s known as one of the most difficult places in New York City to get to, which makes it an object of equal frustration and fascination for urban explorers near and far. (I was lucky enough to accompany a photographer with a long relationship with the Parks Department and a buddy with a boat—one or both are pretty essential if you’re trying to get here.)

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_03

The largest and most intriguing book I’ve ever seen was filled with the most mundane details.

If you never make it to North Brother Island, take heart in the fact that it’s best appreciated from afar, where distance allows the imagination to fill in the obscured reaches beneath its canopy and populate the crumbling towers visible on its shore. An abandoned island is the most natural thing in the world to romanticize, but in the light of day, the enigma dissolves. As menacing as the old buildings may appear, they’re ultimately indifferent.

But at day’s end, the sun slips low on the horizon and the ruins of Riverside Hospital begin to gleam. Our boat departs just as the light approaches a kind of golden splendor before winking into darkness. Receding from view as you near Barretto Point at sunset, North Brother Island regains a bit of its mystery. Come to think of it, no one’s ever been permitted to go there after dark…

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_01

Green leaves and blue skies illuminate a crumbling auditorium with jewel tones.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_07

Inside the tuberculosis pavilion.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_08

Metal barricades in an isolation room kept residents from breaking the windows.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_09

Most of the hospital’s glass fixtures had been vandalized…

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_13

…but the island exhibits a near-complete lack of graffiti.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_15

A spiral staircase in the former Nurses’ Residence.

North Brother Island_Abandoned NYC_Will Ellis_18

Walls were stripped to their skeletons in this dormitory.

No floors

A doorway holds steady in a collapsed section of the Nurses’ Home, where a few saplings have taken root.


 

 


Talking Trash in Dubos Point Wildlife Sanctuary

Yellowing remains of a small vessel permanently docked in Dubos Point.

Yellowing remains of a small vessel permanently docked in Dubos Point.

Take the A train past JFK. You’ll be one of a handful of travelers left on a car that seemed well over capacity a moment ago; the babble of the crowd fades to the soft hum of an unimpeded machine.  Nobody asks you for money, or directions.  If you’ve made it this far, you know where you’re going.

Suddenly, the ground drops out and you’re gliding over the silver Jamaica Bay.  The train runs just above sea level, skimming over a surface that teems visibly with diving cormorants.  Clustered with skeletal boat frames, aged marinas jut from a neglected shoreline across the water, to the west, a row of painted houses stand on stilts. There’s no place like the Rockaways to experience New York as a city by the sea.

Head east at Hammels Wye, and a brief walk through the quiet neighborhood of Averne will lead you to a little known peninsula called Dubos Point, one of the last fragments of salt marsh left in a city that was once ringed with tidal wetlands.  The marsh was filled with dredged materials in 1912 in preparation for an ill-fated real estate development, but over the last century, the area has reverted to its natural state.  In 1988, the land was acquired by the Parks Department, deemed a wildlife sanctuary, and given an official name for the first time (Rene Dubos was a microbiologist and environmental activist who coined the phrase “Think Globally, Act Locally”).

Parks officials envisioned marked nature trails and boardwalks for community use, and planned to build nesting structures and employ part-time patrol staff to encourage wildlife and keep the place clean, but none of this came to be.  The Audubon Society of New York maintained the grounds sporadically until 1999, but abandoned its post citing a lack of resources.  Since then, the area has been largely neglected, leaving its care up to volunteers.  Green Apple Corps and the Rockaway Waterfront Alliance have orchestrated several clean-up events over the years, but they’re facing an uphill battle.

Garbage piled up on the bank.

Garbage and driftwood piled up on the bank.

Every day, the shores of Dubos Point are bombarded with an onslaught of garbage, and it’s not coming from park visitors (the preserve is technically not open to the public).  Most of the refuse is washed up from the bay, after a long journey through storm drains that began in the littered streets of New York City. Familiar objects are made strange, touched by a long encounter with an invisible world, caked with green algae, eroded with salt, barnacle-burdened and bleached by the sun. The entire peninsula resounds with the constant susurration of wind through grass. For all these reeds are hiding, perhaps they whisper secrets; mud-moored vessels, decaying toys, and saltbored furniture lay half-concealed in the tidal growth.

A boat moored in a reedy grave.

A boat moored in a reedy grave.

Standing water in old tires and plastic debris makes for a perfect breeding ground for the area’s most populous species.  My first steps onto the grounds of Dubos Point seemed to disturb some ancient curse, as great swarms of mosquitoes rose from their stagnant hollows to draw my blood sacrifice. The Parks department has been criticized in the past for neglecting its duties at Dubos Point while mosquito infestation reached “plague proportions” in the late 90s, rendering backyards unusable from April to October.  After years of complaints and little improvement, some residents resorted to building outdoor shelters for brown bats, a natural insect predator.  Today, the only visible improvement made on the grounds of Dubos Point is a line of Mosquito Magnet kiosks, placed every 100 feet along the boundary of the preserve.

A toy car abandoned in the marsh

A toy car abandoned in the marsh

Despite decades of pollution, the Jamaica Bay harbors hundreds of species of wildlife, and the water is cleaner today than it was 100 years ago.  As one of the last remaining pockets of undeveloped land in New York, the estuary supplies an essential resting place for migratory birds along the Atlantic Flyway; egrets, herons, and peregrine falcons are spotted here. Looking past the garbage, you can still make out the natural beauty of Dubos Point, and imagine what this whole region was like 400 years ago. Neck-high cordgrass is abundant, trapping bits of decayed organisms to fuel a thriving, though limited, ecosystem.  Throngs of fiddler crabs crowd the soggy ground, scuttling sideways with one collective mind, crunching underfoot like eggshells. The breezy silence is only interrupted by an occasional splash from a jumping fish, or the roar of a plane, taking off from the crowded runways of JFK just across the water. Off the curling tip of Dubos Point, fishermen still cast their lines in the Sommerville Basin, affirming a bond we’ve all but lost.

12,000 of the original 16,000 acres of wetlands around the Jamaica Bay have already been filled in for development, and sources predict that the last of the saltwater marshes could disappear in the next 20 years. It’s a shame to see one of the few protected areas in this condition, when its potential for education and recreation is so apparent. New York needs to protect its wild spaces, and sometimes that means getting our hands dirty. To learn about volunteer opportunities with the Parks Department, visit their website.  And check back for information on the next Dubos Point clean-up.

Decaying Hull festers in the noonday sun

A decaying hull festers in the noonday sun.

A beach shelter built from salvaged garbage and tarps.

A beach shelter built from salvaged garbage and tarps.

A single shoe stranded amid nautical debris.

A single shoe stranded amid nautical debris.

Skeletal remains of a water vessel.

Skeletal remains of a water vessel.

Rotting pilings show that this land was once used for something.

Rotting pilings point to an earlier use for the land.

Barnacled motors stuck in the sand.

Barnacled motors stuck in the sand.

Desolate Marshlands

A desolate area of the marsh.

Dead ends abound where the street meets the water in quiet Averne.

Dead ends abound where streets meet the Sommerville basin.

Not a wildlife sanctuary, this is a actually a sidewalk.

This may look like a wildlife sanctuary, but it’s actually a sidewalk.

An overgrown lot advertising yet another housing development.

An overgrown lot advertising yet another housing development.

Don't Litter

Don’t Litter.


 

 


Enter your email address to follow AbandonedNYC and receive new posts by email.

Instagram

Gloomy days have me reflecting on this image from 2014... The ghostly Red Hook Grain Terminal seen through the fog. ⚓️🌾 ... #mood #fog #abandoned #redhook #abandonedplaces #urbex #redhookgrainterminal #brooklyn #abandonednyc
The incredible Bou Inania Medersa. Fes, Morocco, 📸 2018. ... #bouinania #morocco #moroccotravel #fes #islamicarchitecture #architecturephotography #mytinyatlas
Jardin Majorelle, Marrakech 2018. 🌵🌴🦋 ... #jardinmajorelle #marrakech #morroco #moroccotravel #travel #plantsofinstagram #cactus #mytinyatlas
Need a ride? Meknes, Morocco 🇲🇦 2018 ... #morocco #moroccotravel #meknes #flakphotorides #travelphotography #mytinyatlas #chariot #treesofinstagram #explore
Lena Dunham’s airy Williamsburg condo featured by @archdigest online this week, 🛋 shot for @heyitserez @compass w/ @dd_reps. ... #interiordesign #brooklyn #brooklynrealestate #celebrityhomes #brooklynstyle
Unpublished photo from the AbandonedNYC archives. 🌿Swimming Pool at Grossinger’s Catskills Resort, 📸 2013. ... #abandonedplaces #abandonedworld #urbex #overgrown #backtonature #grossingers #abandonedny #abandonednyc #abandoned
Two of my best NYC street finds—picked up the mirror in the UES and the cat in Bay Ridge. (via @brooklynanimalaction) 🌿#blackcatsofinstagram #animalrescue #catsofinstagram #foundobjects #interiordesign #philodendron #catsandplants #exvoto #philodendronselloum #designsponge #housetour
My favorite element of @aliciascardetta and I’s home is this antique Globe-Wernicke bookcase, filled with all of the weird flea market finds I’ve picked up over the years through all of our travels. 💀⌛️🕰🤡 Thanks to @designsponge for sharing my odd collection with your readers this week. #collections #curio #curiocabinet #oddities #cabinetofcuriosities #collector #fleamarketfinds #darkinteriors #wunderkammer #interiordesign #shelfie
Our apartment is featured on @designsponge today! 🔗 in bio for the full tour. 🏠 @aliciascardetta 💕 #hometour #designsponge #interiordesign #brooklyndesign
📸 at North Brother Island in 2014. Home to an abandoned hospital complex where the infamous “Typhoid Mary” was quarantined, the island is currently designated a wildlife preserve. #tbt #nyc #northbrotherisland #abandoned #abandonedplaces #abandonednyc #urbex
More loveliness from my recent shoot at @maapilim’s SoHo pop-up, featured on @dezeen this week. #retaildesign #dezeen #interiordesign #minimalism #interiorphotography
Turn to the Sunday Business section of today’s paper for my image of art dealer David Zwirner’s strikingly minimal office. Part of the @nytimes “Power Source” series on the spaces where power sits. #onassignment #powersource #nyt
%d bloggers like this: