//
explore
Historic, Hospitals, Military

Inside Fort Totten Part 2: The Army Hospital

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

A tin ceiling crumbles in an Army Hospital dayroom.

Constructed in 1906, the Fort Totten Army Hospital has been vacant since the area was decommissioned as a military base in the mid 70s.  Today, this once thriving infirmary with a 68-bed capacity exhibits a harrowing level of decay.  Beneath an attractive Colonial Revival facade, hospital rooms self-destruct in slow motion.

Originally known as the Post Hospital, and later named after Dr. Walter Reed, the medical center is situated on a scenic bank of the Long Island Sound on the southeast portion of Willet’s Point, in an area currently under the jurisdiction of the NYC Fire Department.  A newly renovated training facility, which once served the military as a barracks and mess hall, sits directly behind the hospital, a prime example of the potential for adaptive reuse of the installation’s vast collection of dilapidated buildings.

Most are in a state of limbo, awaiting a white knight to cough up the millions necessary to preserve and repurpose the structures, but unfortunately, Walter Reed Hospital is long past the point of no return.

Inside, a nearly complete lack of artifacts disappoints, but allows the structural degeneration to take center stage.  Watch your step—some doorways give way to a two-story chasm, filled with jagged debris and splintered beams.  Buckling walls, bulging floors, and collapsed light fixtures mingle in the wretched sea-foam green interior.  Its a preservationist’s worst nightmare, but it only scratches the surface of Fort Totten’s decay.

With a third of the property somewhat maintained by the Parks Department, the grounds are currently open to the public.  It’s worth the trip to see this moribund military base while most of its history remains (precariously) intact.  With some of the last remaining open spaces in Queens, this little known park makes a perfect picnic spot, but I wouldn’t sit too close to its ill-fated infirmary—Fort Totten Army Hospital is falling down. 

(For more on the past, present, and future of Fort Totten, see Part 1.)

-Will Ellis

Related Links:
Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

“Demolition by Neglect”

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

This 1926 kitchen annex was the hospital’s latest addition, but it’s one of the first areas to collapse.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

A devastated room on the first floor.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Tread carefully.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Vines take root in a first floor bathroom.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Dangling fluorescent fixtures in Room 27.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

A perilous corridor, with the basement visible through a hole in the floor.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

One level down, the entrance to a supply room.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Even this small utility room was done in sea-foam green.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

A chair left in the basement was one of the only remaining pieces of furniture.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

A rag sways in the breeze from a basement window.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

The attic, distinguished by angled ceilings and dormer windows.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Rotting walls on the fourth floor.

Inside Fort Totten Army Hospital

Someone wasn’t happy with their room number.

For more Queens abandonments, check out:
About these ads

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Inside Fort Totten Part 2: The Army Hospital

  1. Beautiful, how dangerous would you say it was to walk around? Are the interiors open to the public, to photograph or film in?

    Posted by Anne | 10-11-12., 11:16 pm
  2. I was born there on September 7th, 1947

    Posted by Sherman F. Childers III | 10-8-13., 8:01 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow AbandonedNYC and receive new posts by email.

Make a Donation Button

Follow on Twitter

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,305 other followers

%d bloggers like this: